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Geoff Delanoy

 

Geoff Delanoy is a visual artist whose work includes photography, digital imaging, and video installation. His most recent body of work was featured in a solo exhibition, Fugitive Landscapes as part of Photo Fest, hosted by the Arts Council of Greater Kalamazoo, Michigan. He resides in Baltimore where he is an Associate Professor and Chair in the Art department at Notre Dame of Maryland University. 


Website: www.geoffdelanoy.com

 

 

Artist statement

 

These images were made at Point Reyes National Seashore in Marin County, California. This body of work was inspired by my first experience with the coast of the Pacific Northwest in the late 90s. Being from the east coast I was taken aback by the landscape.

 

The black and white photographs in this series, made with a modified Holga camera, are the result of a contemplative interaction with the terrain. They interpret the topography and the constant flux of the environment and the impact of the elements upon the landscape.

 

Text and photography by Geoff Delanoy.

 

 

Geoff Delanoy: Fugitive Landscapes

Juror’s review

 

The images in Geoff Delanoy’s series seem to belong to what may be identified as a new photographic genre, that of “landscape noir.” The dark tones of the black and white photographs offer an aesthetic experience that is considerably at odds with what we usually expect and receive from landscape photography. Instead of concentrating on viewpoints and visual properties that are pleasing to the human eye, these photographs show us a rather sober and solemn face of the natural. Another characteristic feature of these images is that the landscape is often presented up-close, giving us the opportunity to observe the details, instead of a more commonly used panoramic view. As if taken in an imagined world, the photographs in Fugitive Landscapes invite us to appreciate our natural environment in a new, albeit darker-toned light.

 

Zsolt Bátori

 

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Titus Simoens

 

Titus Simoens (born 1985) received his Bachelor degree in photography from the Karel de Grote school in Antwerp in 2008. He works mostly on autonomous projects. In 2008 he travelled through Romania, photographing people at their homes where he spent several nights for his series Close to Romania. In 2009 he made a photo and video documentary: Miles Away, about two cowboys living in Idaho, America. These series got published in several magazines in Belgium and abroad.

 

Currently Titus published his first book: Blue, See - Mount Song - Los Domadores, for this work he spent several times in schools for 3 years in Belgium, China and Cuba where young boys learn something very specific for the future. This work was exhibited in BOZAR in Brussels in 2014 and in the Caermersklooster in Ghent in 2015, later this year it will be seen in the Kunsthal in Rotterdam, NL and in the Manuel Rivera-Ortiz Foundation in Arles, FR.

 

Titus has won the Monography series award in 2014 and the Nikon Young promising Photographer award in 2012 in Belgium, in that same year he was the winner of the Foto8 summershow in Londen.

 

Titus his work got published in Réponses photo, EXTRA Magazine, GUP magazine, De Standaard, L'Oeil De La Photographie, OAI13, Monthly Photography Magazine Korea, Vrij Nederland, 6mois, Dazed Digital, Worbz, BBC news, Picture Depts, Blink Magazine, etc.

 

Website: www.titussimoens.be

 

 

Artist statement

 

The series are about children who grow up at a very young age in schools where discipline creates order. They stay at these schools from the age of six until the age of eighteen and they learn something very specific for the future. Blue, See takes place in a sailor school in Belgium and Mount Song in a Kung Fu school in China.

 

For a few months, I lived with these young students until I became part of their world. I have tried to stay within the narrow mechanisms of those school systems, waiting for the moments that escaped the strict daily routine. In march of this year the book Blue, See - Mount Song - Los Domadores was published by Belgium publisher Hannibal.

 

In the book I include 600 images that the children made themselves during my stay at their schools. I always combine these images of the kids when I show my work in an exhibition.

 

Text and photography by Titus Simoens.

 

 

Titus Simoens: ​Blue, See // Mount Song

Juror’s review

 

The work presented here is a collection from two series that are connected by virtue of both their content and their visual form. Both series were taken at a school for a select group of boys where they learn something unusual or different, something that is not taught at mainstream general educational institutions. The atmosphere of these uncommon places of learning is keenly observed; as a result, while we remain outsiders to their world, we are drawn into the daily lives of the boys and have some insight into their hopes, worries, joys and ambitions, into what matters to them in their isolated environment. Nevertheless, the series of photographs do not merely document a certain way of life. The strong visual unity of these pieces stems from the consistent compositional use of one or two characteristic colours against the more subdued background of the images.

 

Zsolt Bátori

 

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EGO(n) István Tóth

 

I have been taking photographs since 1974. During the seventies and eighties I experimented with analogue and Polaroid photography as well. I have had numerous group and solo exhibitions in Hungary. I was a cofounder of the instART group, and I am also member of the Hungarian Association of Photographers.

 

 

Artist statement

 

The series is based on the continuous surveillance of specific places by simulating a fictional surveillance system. The properties of the particular location make it possible to order the images into sequences, of which some may become narrative series.

 

The initial project is now extended to simulating infra camera technology, and also to create new stories at the borderline of the real and the fictional by merging different frames into one image.

 

Text and photography by EGO(n) István Tóth.

 

 

EGO(n) István Tóth: Surveillance

Juror’s review

 

The photographs in this series not only engage us with their haunting visual imagery but they also reveal some interesting aspects of image production and use. Simulating the visual outcome of surveillance recording is accomplished in at least two respects. First, the images are produced from a viewpoint that closely resembles the high-angle shots taken by surveillance cameras. Second, the blurry, grainy and pixelated images look just like their real life counterparts, the low resolution frames extracted from surveillance video recordings. EGO(n) István Tóth, however, presents his images in colour, a marked departure from the uniformly monochromatic world of surveillance systems. As a result, while we have some of the standard characteristics of the genre evoked, we are also reminded of the fictive nature of the series that we cannot ignore. The merging of the mundanely factual with the dreamily fictitious opens up a space for imagining all sorts of stories behind the framed moments.

 

Zsolt Bátori

 

 

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Teri Havens

 

Teri has been photographing fragments of American culture as a way of connecting with the world around her for the past twenty-five years. After studying photojournalism at the University of Texas and serving as an intern at the Magnum photo agency in New York, Teri developed her printmaking skills in darkrooms improvised in kitchens and motel rooms across the country.

 

In 2012, after years of being primarily a “daylight” photographer, Teri started experimenting with night photography. Using moonlight or available streetlight she began new series of social landscapes that reveal a lonely, yet enduring portrait of a nearly forgotten America.

 

Teri currently lives in Marble, Colorado. When not lost in the backcountry, or in her darkroom producing palladium prints, she can be found in her beloved 1988 Ford Van on the track of the perfect roadside bar. Her work has been exhibited internationally and published in The London Sunday Times, The Sun and on the NPR website. In 2010 she was a Terry O’Neill finalist, and received a Puffin Foundation grant in 2012. 

 

Website: terihavens.com

 

 

Last Light

 

There is solace in the night. I find it comforting when the sun finally slips away, taking with it the expectations and disappointments of the day. Darkness shrouds the superfluous, concealing the flaws of the world  - or at least muting them temporarily. Things that have only a supporting role in daylight take center stage under the stark beam of a streetlight or the silken glow of a full moon. I’m attracted to old structures that stand detached and self-sufficient: a church, rigidly upright on an abandoned plain refusing to kneel to the earth’s inevitable reclamation; a liquor store beckoning like a cinderblock Shangri –La; an aging trailer home, once a symbol of life untethered, now settled into permanent stasis, enduring as a monument to the fortitude of the life within.

 

And then there are the bars.

 

I’ve always had a thing for bars.  The more marginal the better. I’m mostly drawn to outliers - raw, dilapidated joints that evoke an earlier, grittier era. Humble, solitary structures cloaked in loneliness and isolation, yet miraculously - as if blessed by some divine patron- still open. An authentic down-to-its-rotting-bones refuge where a hard-edged world is numbed and softened by alcohol and dim lighting.  

 

Defiant vestiges of the past, the bar always seems the last to go. After the grocery store, the lumberyard and the barbershop surrendered to the future and shut their doors for the final time, the bar stayed on. Slumped alone on the edge of a discarded town, its neon spills out onto the asphalt and burns through the night.

 

Inside, the beer is cold, and the jukebox is stocked with George Jones and dirges from an irretrievable past.

 

Text and photography by Teri Havens.

 

 

Teri Havens: ​Last Light

Juror’s review

 

Despite their compositional contribution and importance, it is not the lights that take the leading role in Teri Havens’s series Last Light. Certainly, they have an important, even determining function in shaping the visual characteristics of the images by illuminating the scenes photographed. Not only that, but they are also the last sources of light in most of these places. They gain even more importance, however, because of what they shed light on. Although we cannot spot a soul in the images, there is still a strong feel of human presence in the illuminated places where people may find shelter, company, and may take rest after a long day. It is the invisible but warm and welcoming inside that is contrasted with the coldly lit outside. Beautiful as they are in their rough and grim reality, we are inclined to escape the external world: to open and enter through one of the doors offered as an exit from the austere outside.

 

Zsolt Bátori

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